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Thread: How-To: Hella Supertone Horns

  1. #1
    your carless administrator
    Join Date
    Feb 2106
    Location
    Seattle

    How-To: Hella Supertone Horns

    reserved.. just putting down some info for now.

    Link to Flickr photoset

    Purchased from www.safedrives.com (really cool site for car safety-related equipment). $64.99USD

    Tools:
    • phillips screwdriver
    • soldering iron
    • heat gun (can use soldering iron)
    • 10mm wrench (you should have dozens) --one open/box wrench, one socket/ratchet.
    • dremel and a bunch of cutoff discs. Cutoff discs made specifically for plastic would be even better.

    Mounting Hardware:
    • 2 x hex bolts 6mm-1 0 x 20mm
    • 2 x lock nuts 6mm-1 0
    • 2 x flat washer 6mm (came in pack of 4)

    Total Cost at Home Depot: $1.24 (w/ 8.5% sales tax). They didn't have stainless, just pathetic zinc plated. I would recommend getting these from a decent hardware store.

    Wiring Hardware:
    • 8 x female spade connectors for 12-10 gauge wire
    • 1 x male spade connector for 12-10 gauge wire
    • 3 x ring connectors (size??) for 12-10 gauge wire
    • 1 x butt connector IF you're going the crimp connector route. Please solder
    • 5-6m of 12-10 gauge wire.
    • soldering supplies: lead-free solder, various sizes of shrinkwrap
    • 4-post 30A Bosch relay that comes with the horns.

    Wiring the Relay:
    • 85 can be a small gauge wire, it goes to the stock horn wire. Since I didn't want to cut the factory harness (gotta keep my car 'stock' , this means wiring over to the stock horn location, 120cm should do it if you want the relay location to be where the fuse box is.
    • 86 is ground, a heavy gauge wire (I used 10 for everything). 30-45cm since I just grounded to the ground point the negative terminal on the battery uses, using a ring connector that fit on the chassis stud and under the nut well.
    • 87 is the power wire to the hella horns. Again 120cm long, but at 80-90cm you need to split it into two wires. I used 10 gauge for all of it, as even one 10 gauge wire is sufficient to power both horns.
    • 30 on the relay goes to your power source. I don't like all sorts of messy wires going to my battery terminals, so I do everything to the main fuse (the one the positive cable from the battery goes to) with ring terminals. My subwoofer, head unit (since it draws too much power for the stock harness by a lot), radar detector, and now horns go there. Make sure to use an in-line fuse within 30cm of the start of that wire (the start being the side at the main fuse).
    • The only wires not covered by this are the horn ground wires, which are pretty self explanatory. I used the stud on the upper radiator support that the stock horn attached to. Just make sure you clean up that area good before you do it, then protect it with some dielectric grease so it doesn't corrode.

    Photos:








    Please note that I did have to trim more of the grille than is shown in the pictures. It fit ok like this but I didn't want the grille rubbing on the horns.
    Last edited by kansei; 03-12-2008 at 04:12 PM.

  2. #2
    I don't wanna sound like an idiot but how exactly does the grille come out? I tried to get it out and thought I was gonna break the thing.


    Quote Originally Posted by Tungsten6
    maybe you should think harder maybe your the one who should be in school if you cant correct my mistakes in your head

  3. #3
    your carless administrator
    Join Date
    Feb 2106
    Location
    Seattle
    Quote Originally Posted by Red5_02 View Post
    I don't wanna sound like an idiot but how exactly does the grille come out? I tried to get it out and thought I was gonna break the thing.
    the two big screws on the left and right edge of the top, then there are two pop clips that hold it in place. You gotta pop the middle out. Then you have to either pull it up and then out, or out and then up, whichever you feel like. There's 3 clips that hold the bottom of the grille to the top of the bumper, and there's two posts that go into the upper radiator support from behind the grille.

    In the last pic I posted you can see the posts that stick out the back of the grille.

  4. #4
    Awesome. Can't wait to install mine ;-)
    2010 Mazda3 Sport GT |used to have a 2002 Mazda Protege 5 | Toronto, Ont.

  5. #5
    I want to get a set of these too. Mine sound like crap.

  6. #6
    your carless administrator
    Join Date
    Feb 2106
    Location
    Seattle
    Quote Originally Posted by paragon View Post
    Awesome. Can't wait to install mine ;-)
    ya they are a LOT of fun. Hit the panic button in an underground parking garage and people run away screaming. It's pain

  7. #7
    lol, I want these too, our horns definitely leave a lot to be desired.
    2003 MazdaSpeed Protege #899 Black Mica - It used to disco.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by kansei View Post
    ya they are a LOT of fun. Hit the panic button in an underground parking garage and people run away screaming. It's pain
    My first question is; is the stock horn positively or negatively wired? I'm specifically looking at Wiring diagram 2 in the English instructions.
    2010 Mazda3 Sport GT |used to have a 2002 Mazda Protege 5 | Toronto, Ont.

  9. #9
    your carless administrator
    Join Date
    Feb 2106
    Location
    Seattle
    It's the opposite of how Subaru horns are.

    Positive wire into the horn, horn grounds through the bracket (stock).

    I don't have the original paperwork to say which diagram number that is though. Maybe I do, I'll go hunt around.

    Somewhere I have the wiring diagram I worked out. That or photos of the harness.

    I can trace the wiring outright right now if I can't find it.

    here's the basics:


    relay power in is the stock wire that hooks up to the horn. Relay ground just goes to a ground point. I used the one the battery grounds to in the engine bay. The high current in comes straight from the battery with a fuse within a foot of the battery, and the high current out goes to the positive terminal on each horn. You'll tee off the high current wire near the horns to keep the wiring as simple as possible. Solder and shrinkwrap this, don't crimp. It's kinda exposed to the elements. Negative from each horn (they don't ground through the bracket like stock) just gets bolted in with the stock horn bolt, as you can see in this pic:
    Last edited by kansei; 02-25-2008 at 03:47 PM.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by kansei View Post
    It's the opposite of how Subaru horns are.

    Positive wire into the horn, horn grounds through the bracket (stock).

    I don't have the original paperwork to say which diagram number that is though. Maybe I do, I'll go hunt around.

    Somewhere I have the wiring diagram I worked out. That or photos of the harness.

    I can trace the wiring outright right now if I can't find it.

    here's the basics:


    relay power in is the stock wire that hooks up to the horn. Relay ground just goes to a ground point. I used the one the battery grounds to in the engine bay. The high current in comes straight from the battery with a fuse within a foot of the battery, and the high current out goes to the positive terminal on each horn. You'll tee off the high current wire near the horns to keep the wiring as simple as possible. Solder and shrinkwrap this, don't crimp. It's kinda exposed to the elements. Negative from each horn (they don't ground through the bracket like stock) just gets bolted in with the stock horn bolt, as you can see in this pic:
    Thanks. I didn't think I had to use the relay that came with the horn because I'm not hooking the setup to a switch? I think its an existing 15A circuit that powers the stock horn, whereas the Supertone is 30A
    2010 Mazda3 Sport GT |used to have a 2002 Mazda Protege 5 | Toronto, Ont.

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